October 20, 2014

Oracle knew of Java vulnerabilities in April and had proof of concept code examples

(LiveHacking.Com) – It turns out that the latest Java vulnerabilities, which are being used to spread malware across the global, aren’t zero day vulnerabilities at all. PC World is reporting that Oracle knew about the existence of the two unpatched Java 7 vulnerabilities since April. Polish security firm Security Explorations reported 19 Java 7 security issues to Oracle on Apr. 2. Those issues included the two zero-day vulnerabilities that are being exploited in the wild now. Including further vulnerabilities that the company reported to Oracle in May, the total reported problems was 29. “We demonstrated 16 full Java SE 7 sandbox compromises with the use of our bugs,” said Adam Gowdiak, the founder and CEO of Security Explorations.

According to the press release which Security Explorations issued at the time, the  security issues violated the “Secure Coding Guidelines for the Java Programming Language”  and most of them demonstrate a specific problem related to Java SE security. As part of the research, Security Explorations developed reliable Proof of Concepts for ALL of the issues found. This included 12 exploits that demonstrated a complete JVM security sandbox bypass.

This means that for the last four months Oracle has had information about critical Java vulnerabilities including proof of concept code. The last status report that Adam Gowdiak received from Oracle revealed that the company was planning to fix the two vulnerabilities, which are being exploited today, in its October Critical Patch Update (CPU).

“Although we stay in touch with Oracle and the communication process has been quite flawless so far, we don’t know why Oracle left so many serious bugs for the Oct. CPU,” Gowdiak said.

Oracle use a 4 month patch cycle (middle of February, June, October) and the next patch is scheduled for October 16.

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