September 30, 2016

Denial of Service attacks reach 150 gigabits per second, higher rates expected

(LiveHacking.Com) – Alex Caro the Chief Technology Officer for Akamai Technologies has told ZDNet that the company has seen Denial of Service attacks which have reached 150 gigabits per second. This is in line with a growing trend for hackers to use DoS as a means to disrupt a websites for ideological, political or commercial reasons. From 2010 to 2011 Akamai saw the number of DDoS attacks against their customers double. This trend is expected to continue in 2012 and 2013.

Akamai’s experiences are similar to those of others in the security industry. According to a hacker forum study, which security vendor Imperva carried out last year, 22% of discussions focused on DoS, slightly higher than SQL injection which accounted for 19% of all discussions. In its Hacker Intelligence Initiative, Monthly Trend Report #12 the company reveals that hackers are now favoring DoS attacks aimed at the Web application layer (rather than at the IP and TCP layers) as these types of attacks decrease costs and are harder to detect.

Distributed Denial of Service attacks, which split the attack load among many machines simultaneously, are being used most to get the public’s and media’s attention. Such attacks are usually accompanied by announcements that reveal the reasons (ideological etc) behind the attack. However DDoS attacks are not limited to hacktivists. DDoS attacks have been used to disrupt businesses for monetary gain including blackmailing a company to pay a ransom other wise the site will be attacked.

The good news is that companies like Akamai seem able (at the moment) to absorb this malicious data.

“Today, we’re probably serving eight, maybe ten terabits per second of traffic at peak, so a 150 gigabit per second denial of service attack is actually fairly small when all is said and done,” said Caro.

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