July 31, 2014

Chrome 24 released with new version of Flash and a $4000 bug fix

Chrome-logo-2011-03-16(LiveHacking.Com) –  Google has released Chrome 24  with support for MathML, a new version of Adobe Flash Player, fixes for various security issues in V8 (v8-3.14.5.3) and $6000 worth of High priority security fixes.

First, Adobe released a new version of Adobe Flash Player this week and Microsoft subsequently updated IE 10 to upgrade its built-in Flash Player. Google normally do the same thing and as expected Chrome 24 contains the latest Flash Player with the security fixes issued by Adobe.

Also, Google fixed some High priority security bugs. It paid security researchers over $6000 for their effort. Erling A Ellingsen and Subodh Iyengar, both of Facebook, got to share $4000 between them for a same origin policy bypass when using a malformed URL bug. The full list of rewards is:

  • [$1000] [162494] High CVE-2012-5145: Use-after-free in SVG layout. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
  • [$4000] [165622] High CVE-2012-5146: Same origin policy bypass with malformed URL. Credit to Erling A Ellingsen and Subodh Iyengar, both of Facebook.
  • [$1000] [165864] High CVE-2012-5147: Use-after-free in DOM handling. Credit to José A. Vázquez.

Google also fixed a number of other security related bugs which were found by Google’s Chrome Security Team:

  • [167122] Medium CVE-2012-5148: Missing filename sanitization in hyphenation support. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Justin Schuh).
  • [166795] High CVE-2012-5149: Integer overflow in audio IPC handling. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Evans).
  • [165601] High CVE-2012-5150: Use-after-free when seeking video. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).
  • [165538] High CVE-2012-5151: Integer overflow in PDF JavaScript. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [165430] Medium CVE-2012-5152: Out-of-bounds read when seeking video. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).
  • [164565] High CVE-2012-5153: Out-of-bounds stack access in v8. Credit to Andreas Rossberg of the Chromium development community.
  • [Windows only] [164490] Low CVE-2012-5154: Integer overflow in shared memory allocation. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Evans).
  • [Mac only] [163208] Medium CVE-2012-5155: Missing Mac sandbox for worker processes. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Julien Tinnes).
  • [162778] High CVE-2012-5156: Use-after-free in PDF fields. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [162776] [162156] Medium CVE-2012-5157: Out-of-bounds reads in PDF image handling. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [162153] High CVE-2013-0828: Bad cast in PDF root handling. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk, with contribution from Gynvael Coldwind, both of Google Security Team.
  • [162114] High CVE-2013-0829: Corruption of database metadata leading to incorrect file access. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Jüri Aedla).
  • [Windows only] [162066] Low CVE-2013-0830: Missing NUL termination in IPC. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Justin Schuh).
  • [161836] Low CVE-2013-0831: Possible path traversal from extension process. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Tom Sepez).
  • [160380] Medium CVE-2013-0832: Use-after-free with printing. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [154485] Medium CVE-2013-0833: Out-of-bounds read with printing. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [154283] Medium CVE-2013-0834: Out-of-bounds read with glyph handling. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [152921] Low CVE-2013-0835: Browser crash with geolocation. Credit to Arthur Gerkis.
  • [150545] High CVE-2013-0836: Crash in v8 garbage collection. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [145363] Medium CVE-2013-0837: Crash in extension tab handling. Credit to Tom Nielsen.
  • [Linux only] [143859] Low CVE-2013-0838: Tighten permissions on shared memory segments. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Palmer).

 

Google updates Chrome to fix a Critical vulnerability and update Flash

(LiveHacking.Com) –  Google has released a new version of Chrome for Windows, Mac and Linux. Chrome 23.0.1271.97 fixes several non-security related bugs along with at least one Critical level security vulnerability. The new version also includes an updated version of Flash following Adobe’s security update.

The Critical level bug is a crash in the history navigation. It was found by Michal Zalewski of the Google Security Team. The other security related bugs, along with the money awarded to the bounty hunter by Google under the Chromium security rewards scheme, are:

  • [$1500] [158204] High CVE-2012-5139: Use-after-free with visibility events. Credit to Chamal de Silva.
  • [$1000] [159429] High CVE-2012-5140: Use-after-free in URL loader. Credit to Chamal de Silva.
  • [160456] Medium CVE-2012-5141: Limit Chromoting client plug-in instantiation. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Jüri Aedla).
  • [160926] Medium CVE-2012-5143: Integer overflow in PPAPI image buffers. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [$2000] [161639] High CVE-2012-5144: Stack corruption in AAC decoding. Credit to pawlkt.

The new version also fixes the following non-security related bugs

  • Some texts in a Website Settings popup are trimmed (Issue: 159156)
  • Linux: <input> selection renders white text on white bg in apps (Issue: 158422)
  • some plugins stopped working (Issue: 159896)
  • Windows 8: Unable to launch system level chrome after self destructing user-level chrome (Issue: 158632)

In Brief: Google releases Chrome 23.0.1271.95 and gives Pinkie Pie $7331

(LiveHacking.Com) –  Google has released a new version of its Chrome browser (23.0.1271.95) just three days after releasing the previous version. This new update is a purely security related release and it fixes two high rated security vulnerabilities.

In Google speak, High means that the vulnerability could let an attacker read or modify confidential data belonging to other web sites. Also vulnerabilities that interfere with browser security features are also high severity.

The first vulnerability fixed, found by Jüri Aedla of the Google Chrome Security Team, was a bug in file path handling. The second, found by Pinkie Pie, was a use-after-free in media source handling. Pinkie Pie’s bug earned the researcher $7331.

Chrome 23.0.1271.91 fixes some High risk security vulnerabilities but nothing Critical

(LiveHacking.Com) – Google has released Chrome 23.0.1271.91 for Windows, Mac and Linux. The release fixes several bugs including an audio problem with Flash when the speaker configuration was set to Quadraphonic, however more importantly it fixes several High risk security vulnerabilities, but nothing ranked as Critical.

This release fixes three vulnerabilities with the  High rating. High in this context means that the vulnerability could let an attacker read or modify confidential data belonging to other web sites. Also vulnerabilities that interfere with browser security features are also high severity.

Under the Chromium security rewards scheme, Justin Drake was given a special reward for finding a bug in OS X which was sufficiently severe or particularly hard to workaround that it affects Chrome indirectly. In this case the High level vulnerability was a connected with a corrupt rendering in the Apple OSX driver for Intel GPUs.

Miaubiz was also hard at work and is credited with finding a High risk use-after-free bug in the SVG filters. Use-after-free bugs are good potential candidates for a full exploit. The other High rated vulnerability was a buffer underflow in libxml. The credit for fining that one goes to Jüri Aedla of the Google Chrome Security Team.

The full list of bugs is as follows:

  • [$1000] [152746] High CVE-2012-5131: Corrupt rendering in the Apple OSX driver for Intel GPUs. Credit to Justin Drake.
  • [$1000] [156567] High CVE-2012-5133: Use-after-free in SVG filters. Credit to miaubiz.
  • [$500] [148638] Medium CVE-2012-5130: Out-of-bounds read in Skia. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
  • [155711] Low CVE-2012-5132: Browser crash with chunked encoding. Credit to Attila Szász.
  • [158249] High CVE-2012-5134: Buffer underflow in libxml. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Jüri Aedla).
  • [159165] Medium CVE-2012-5135: Use-after-free with printing. Credit to Fermin Serna of Google Security Team.
  • [159829] Medium CVE-2012-5136: Bad cast in input element handling. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).

It is worth noting that Google keep the referenced bugs private until a majority of Chrome users are up to date with the fixes.

Google updates Chrome after successful exploit at Pwnium 2

(LiveHacking.Com) – Google has released a rapid update to its Chrome web browser after it was successfully exploited at the Google run Pwnium 2 hacking competition. Chrome 22.0.1229.94, which is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux, fixes a SVG use-after-free and IPC arbitrary file write bug that was successfully used by Pinkie Pie to fully exploit Chrome. The prize money was $60,000 which is the top amount awarded for a full Chrome exploit on a fully patched Windows 7  PC using only bugs in Chrome itself.

“We’re delighted at the success of Pwnium 2, and anticipate additional hardening and future improvements to Chrome as a result of the competition,” wrote Jason Kersey from Google’s Chrome team.

The official bug list is as follows:

  • [$60,000][154983][154987] Critical CVE-2012-5112: SVG use-after-free and IPC arbitrary file write. Credit to Pinkie Pie.

PinkiePie (aka PwniePie) is no stranger to exploiting Chrome. Back in March he also received $60,000 after successfully demonstrating an exploit at the first Pwnium competition. Shortly after Google issued 17.0.963.79 to fix the vulnerability used. At the time, Jason Kersey from the Google Chrome team is quoted as calling the exploit “a beautiful piece of work.”

Google updates Chrome to fix Critical security vulnerability in audio device handling

(LiveHacking.Com) – Google has released Chrome 22.0.1229.92 to fix several security related bugs, including a Critical security vulnerability in its audio device handling, and to update the built-in Adobe Flash player. Google paid out over $4000 to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG for his help in finding the audio related bug and a crash in Skia text rendering.

The list of security fixes are:

[$1000] [138208] High CVE-2012-2900: Crash in Skia text rendering. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
[$3133.7] [147499] Critical CVE-2012-5108: Race condition in audio device handling. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
[$500] [148692] Medium CVE-2012-5109: OOB read in ICU regex. Credit to Arthur Gerkis.
[151449] Medium CVE-2012-5110: Out-of-bounds read in compositor. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).
[151895] Low CVE-2012-5111: Plug-in crash monitoring was missing for Pepper plug-ins. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Chris Evans).

It is worth noting that Google keep the referenced bugs private until a majority of Chrome users are up to date with the fixes.

Also included in Chrome 22.0.1229.92 is the latest version of the Adobe Flash Player which was just updated to address vulnerabilities that could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system. The new versions in Chrome are 11.4.31.110 for Windows and Linux, and 11.4.402.287 for Macintosh.

Google releases Chrome 22 with $28,500 worth of security fixes and a workaround for a Windows kernel memory corruption

(LiveHacking.Com) – Google has released Chrome 22 with a variety of new features including a new Mouse Lock API (used mainly by 3D games) and some very important security fixes including a Critical level fix for a Windows kernel memory corruption. Under its reward scheme, which pays security researchers real money for their efforts in finding vulnerabilities in Chrome, Google paid out $28500 for vulnerabilities fixed in Chrome 22, one of which (the Windows kernel memory corruption) was award $10,000 while two UXSS  vulnerabilities earned Sergey Glazunov $15,000.

There are no details yet on the Windows kernel memory corruption or the nature of the Universal XSS flaws as Google (wisely) keeps the bug details private until a majority of users have updated. The Critical flaw in Windows (146254 / CVE-2012-2897) is credited to Eetu Luodemaa and Joni Vähämäki, both from Documill.

The UXSS errors are rated has High:

  • [143439] High CVE-2012-2889: UXSS in frame handling. Credit to Sergey Glazunov.
  • [143437] High CVE-2012-2886: UXSS in v8 bindings. Credit to Sergey Glazunov.

Other security related bugs fixed (along with the related rewards) are:

  • [$2000] [139814] High CVE-2012-2881: DOM tree corruption with plug-ins. Credit to Chamal de Silva.
  • [$1000] [135432] High CVE-2012-2876: Buffer overflow in SSE2 optimizations. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
  • [$1000] [140803] High CVE-2012-2883: Out-of-bounds write in Skia. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
  • [$1000] [143609] High CVE-2012-2887: Use-after-free in onclick handling. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
  • [$1000] [143656] High CVE-2012-2888: Use-after-free in SVG text references. Credit to miaubiz.
  • [$1000] [144899] High CVE-2012-2894: Crash in graphics context handling. Credit to Sławomir Błażek.
  • [Mac only] [$1000] [145544] High CVE-2012-2896: Integer overflow in WebGL. Credit to miaubiz.
  • [$500] [137707] Medium CVE-2012-2877: Browser crash with extensions and modal dialogs. Credit to Nir Moshe.
  • [$500] [139168] Low CVE-2012-2879: DOM topology corruption. Credit to pawlkt.
  • [$500] [141651] Medium CVE-2012-2884: Out-of-bounds read in Skia. Credit to Atte Kettunen of OUSPG.
  • [132398] High CVE-2012-2874: Out-of-bounds write in Skia. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).
  • [134955] [135488] [137106] [137288] [137302] [137547] [137556] [137606] [137635] [137880] [137928] [144579] [145079] [145121] [145163] [146462] Medium CVE-2012-2875: Various lower severity issues in the PDF viewer. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk of Google Security Team, with contributions by Gynvael Coldwind of Google Security Team.
  • [137852] High CVE-2012-2878: Use-after-free in plug-in handling. Credit to Fermin Serna of Google Security Team.
  • [139462] Medium CVE-2012-2880: Race condition in plug-in paint buffer. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [140647] High CVE-2012-2882: Wild pointer in OGG container handling. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Inferno).
  • [142310] Medium CVE-2012-2885: Possible double free on exit. Credit to the Chromium development community.
  • [143798] [144072] [147402] High CVE-2012-2890: Use-after-free in PDF viewer. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk of Google Security Team, with contributions by Gynvael Coldwind of Google Security Team.
  • [144051] Low CVE-2012-2891: Address leak over IPC. Credit to Lei Zhang of the Chromium development community.
  • [144704] Low CVE-2012-2892: Pop-up block bypass. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [144799] High CVE-2012-2893: Double free in XSL transforms. Credit to Google Chrome Security Team (Cris Neckar).
  • [145029] [145157] [146460] High CVE-2012-2895: Out-of-bounds writes in PDF viewer. Credit to Mateusz Jurczyk of Google Security Team, with contributions by Gynvael Coldwind of Google Security Team.

The new mouse lock API included in Chrome 22 allows 3D applications, such as first-person games, to offer users control of the in-game 3D perspective using the mouse, without moving outside the window or bumping into the edge of their screen. Google recommends this first-person shooter demo created by Mozilla.

Google pays out $3500 to security researchers for fixes in Chrome 21.0.1180.89

(LiveHacking.Com) – Google has released Chrome 21.0.1180.89 for Linux, Mac and Windows to fix several bugs and address a number of security vulnerabilities. Under its rewards scheme, which Google set up to pay researchers who find security related bugs in the Chrome source code, Google paid out $3500 for five of the eight bugs squashed.

Three of the bugs are rated as High, which means the vulnerability could let an attacker read or modify confidential data belonging to other web sites. Also vulnerabilities that interfere with browser security features are also high severity. The first High severity bug earned $1000 for Miaubiz and was related to a bad cast with run-ins. The spotting of a bad cast in XSL transforms pocketed Nicolas Gregoire $1000 while the third High severity bug was found by Google itself, a fix to avoid stale buffers in URL loading.

The full list of bugs fixed is as follows:

  • [$500] [121347] Medium CVE-2012-2865: Out-of-bounds read in line breaking. Credit to miaubiz.
  • [$1000] [134897] High CVE-2012-2866: Bad cast with run-ins. Credit to miaubiz.
  • [135485] Low CVE-2012-2867: Browser crash with SPDY.
  • [$500] [136881] Medium CVE-2012-2868: Race condition with workers and XHR. Credit to miaubiz.
  • [137778] High CVE-2012-2869: Avoid stale buffer in URL loading. Credit to Fermin Serna of the Google Security Team.
  • [138672] [140368] Low CVE-2012-2870: Lower severity memory management issues in XPath. Credit to Nicolas Gregoire.
  • [$1000] [138673] High CVE-2012-2871: Bad cast in XSL transforms. Credit to Nicolas Gregoire.
  • [$500] [142956] Medium CVE-2012-2872: XSS in SSL interstitial. Credit to Emmanuel Bronshtein.
Note that the referenced bugs will be kept private until a majority of Chrome users have upgraded.

Adobe releases surprise update for Flash

(LiveHacking.Com) – Just one week after releasing a security update for its Flash Player, Adobe has now released a second security update and, unlike last week’s update, it also covers Android. The update for Adobe Flash Player brings the version number for Windows, Macintosh and Linux to 11.4.402.265, users of Adobe Flash Player 11.1.115.11 and earlier versions on Android 4.x devices can now upgrade to Adobe Flash Player 11.1.115.17. The updates fix multiple vulnerabilities that could cause a crash and potentially allow an attacker to take control of the affected system.

There are six critical bug fixes in this release.  This means that, if exploited, these bugs  would allow malicious native-code to execute, potentially without a user being aware. The first four bugs are memory corruption vulnerabilities that could lead to code execution, the fifth is an integer overflow vulnerability and the last is a cross-domain information leak vulnerability.

The update has taken many IT managers and security experts by surprise. Adobe (in recent times) releases security updates for its products on the second Tuesday of the month. However it has also remained committed to being flexible when faced with a zero-day attack. Since this new release could be considered out-of-band (as last week’s update also covered Shockwave Player and Acrobat Reader), does Adobe know something about a zero day attack which hasn’t yet been published? Or was last weeks update the out-of-band release as the CVE-2012-1535 vulnerability was being exploited in the wild (via a malicious Word document) and this release is the normal monthly security update?

As a result of the updates Google has released a new version of the Chrome web browser.

AFFECTED SOFTWARE VERSIONS

  • Adobe Flash Player 11.3.300.271 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh and Linux operating systems
  • Adobe Flash Player 11.1.115.11 and earlier versions for Android 4.x
  • Adobe Flash Player 11.1.111.10 and earlier versions for Android 3.x and 2.x
  • Adobe AIR 3.3.0.3670 and earlier versions for Windows and Macintosh
  • Adobe AIR 3.3.0.3690 SDK (includes AIR for iOS) and earlier versions
  • Adobe AIR 3.3.0.3650 and earlier versions for Android

Google ups bounties for finding vulnerabilities in Chrome and offers over $2 million in prize money for Pwnium 2

(LiveHacking.Com) – Many people have benefited from Google’s Chrome Vulnerability Rewards Program which was created to reward security researchers who invest their time and effort in helping find security vulnerabilities in Chrome and its open source counterpart Chromium. Not only do Google get a securer browser, not only do users get a safer web experience but browers like Safari benefit as it is built on the same WebKit rendering engine.

Google, which has paid out over $1 million dollars in rewards, has recently made two big announcements with regards to the rewards it is offering researchers. First, three new $1000 rewards have been announced which will be added to the base reward for finding vulnerabilities that are at least particularly exploitable, for bugs in stable areas of the code base and for serious bugs which impact a significantly wider range of products than just Chrome (e.g. open source libraries).

Google has also announced that it will host a second Pwnium competition. Pwnium 2 will be held on Oct 10th, 2012 at the Hack In The Box 10 year anniversary conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The prize money up for grabs totals $2 million:

  • $60,000: ‘Full Chrome exploit’: Chrome / Win7 local OS user account persistence using only bugs in Chrome itself.
  • $50,000: ‘Partial Chrome exploit’: Chrome / Win7 local OS user account persistence using at least one bug in Chrome itself, plus other bugs. For example, a WebKit bug combined with a Windows kernel bug.
  • $40,000: ‘Non-Chrome exploit’: Flash / Windows / other. Chrome / Win7 local OS user account persistence that does not use bugs in Chrome. For example, bugs in one or more of Flash, Windows or a driver.
  • $Panel decision: ‘Incomplete exploit’: An exploit that is not reliable, or an incomplete exploit chain. For example, code execution inside the sandbox but no sandbox escape; or a working sandbox escape in isolation.

“For Pwnium 2, we want to reward people who get ‘part way’ as we could definitely learn from this work. Our rewards panel will judge any such works as generously as we can,” wrote  Chris Evans, a software engineer at Google.