September 30, 2016

In brief: Red Hat gets EAL4+ Certification for Enterprise Linux 6

(LiveHacking.Com) – Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 has been awarded the Common Criteria Certification at Evaluation Assurance Level 4+ (EAL4+) for the Operating System Protection Profile (OSPP) including extended modules for Advanced Management, Advanced Audit, Labeled Security, and Virtualization. EAL4+ is the highest level of assurance for an unmodified commercial operating system.

Used by the federal government and other organizations, the Common Criteria is an internationally recognized set of standards used to assess the security and assurance of technology products. The newly awarded certification proves to government agencies, financial institutions, and other security-sensitive markets that Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 meets government security standards.

Part of the certification provides assurance that using RHEL 6 with the KVM hypervisor allows providers to host many guest operating systems on the same machine while keeping them separated from each other using Mandatory Access Control technology developed by the NSA.

“This is marks our 15th completed Common Criteria certification for Red Hat Enterprise Linux, earning Red Hat a place at the top of the list of the industry’s most certified operating systems. We’ve been deeply committed to security certifications so that customers can confidently turn to Red Hat for the expertise to deploy open source solutions at maximum security levels, and our work with Dell, HP, IBM and SGI on this certification reinforces that government customers can run Red Hat Enterprise Linux with confidence on a wide variety of hardware from many of the industry’s top providers,” said Paul Smith, vice president and general manager, Public Sector operations, Red Hat.

Linux 2.6.39 Memory Handling Vulnerability

(LiveHacking.Com) – Exploits have started appearing that make it possible to gain root privileges on some versions of the Linux kernel due to a flaw in the  /proc/<pid>/mem handling. The vulnerability first came to light when Linus Torvalds released a Linux kernel update last week to fix the flaw and the subsequent analysis of the bug at  Nerdling Sapple.

The bug, which was discovered by Jüri Aedla, allows a local, unprivileged user to escalate their privileges. The problem is that write support to /proc/<pid>/mem was re-enabled in the kernel but with insufficient permissions checking. This means that all Linux kernels >=2.6.39 are vulnerable, up until the fix noted above.

Red Hat have released a small C program which will test a kernel to see if it is vulnerable. If you are not sure if you are running an affected kernel version compile and run the test from https://bugzilla.redhat.com/attachment.cgi?id=556461:

$ gcc -o test test.c
$ ./test
vulnerable

You can read Red Hat’s full security advisory here. Canonical, the makers of Ubuntu Linux, have also announced the release an update for Ubuntu 11.10. The fix can be applied using a standard system update followed by a reboot.

Red Hat: Vulnerability in OpenSSL

Red Hat released update packages for openssl that fix one security issue for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having important security impact.

OpenSSL is a toolkit that implements the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL v2/v3) and Transport Layer Security (TLS v1) protocols, as well as a full-strength, general purpose cryptography library.

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With reference to Red Hat support forum, A race condition flaw has been found in the OpenSSL TLS server extension parsing code, which could affect some multithreaded OpenSSL applications. Under certain specific conditions, it may be possible for a remote attacker to trigger this race condition and cause such an application to crash, or possibly execute arbitrary code with the permissions of the application. (CVE-2010-3864)

Note, this issue does not affect the Apache HTTP Server. Refer to Red Hat Bugzilla bug 649304 for more technical details on how to determine if your application is affected.

This update is recommended to all OpenSSL users. For the update to take effect, all services linked to the OpenSSL library must be restarted, or the system rebooted.

This update is available via the Red Hat Network. Details on how to use the Red Hat Network to apply this update are available at http://kbase.redhat.com/faq/docs/DOC-11259

Mr. Rob Hulswit has reported this bug to Red Hat.